Archives for posts with tag: IBM

3c8150737b081547e7dfd92ac0c3505e92e650c2_s

Tiger Woods was a planned superstar. When he was three he appeared on the Mike Douglas Show, at age five he appeared on Golf Digest. So far, he has won 14 majors and he might win more than Jack Nicklaus’ 18. His career is about control and planning. Nutrition, swing, attitude, psychology: he’s the poster child of planned success.

Enter Bubba Watson.

Watson has never had a coach, a trainer, a nutritionist, or a sports psychologist, and he’s proud of it. He has never had a golf lesson. And he just won the Masters.

I’m sure he broke Gladwell’s 10,000 hour rule, I’m sure he spent much of his waking time perfecting his game. But, it’s apparent he did it on his own accord. Following his rules. His mindset. And he succeeded by being creative.

According to a new survey of 1,500 chief executives conducted by IBM’s Institute for Business Value, CEO’s identify “creativity” as the most important leadership competency for the successful enterprise of the future. That’s creativity – not operational effectiveness, influence, or even dedication. Coming out of the worst economic downturn in their professional lifetimes, when managerial discipline and rigor ruled the day, this indicates a remarkable shift in attitude. It is consistent with the study’s other major finding: Global complexity is the foremost issue confronting these CEOs and their enterprises. The chief executives see a large gap between the level of complexity coming at them and their confidence that their enterprises are equipped to deal with it.

Until now creativity has generally been viewed as fuel for the engines of research or product development, not the essential leadership asset that must permeate an enterprise.

If I was betting man, I’d put my future money on Bubba. He’s good at improvising, not following the advice of experts. He’s good at listening to his own voice, not listening to a coach.

Go Bubba.

a4988a31fbbd2ae39a3edfb44be9af977c00e6a9_m

This week I participated in the Beyond Cause Marketing Summit, presented by causeShift.

The premise:

“Let’s face it – cause marketing isn’t getting the job done. For all the money and attention raised, not enough is being done to address the major challenges facing society today. It’s time to shift our thinking and approach.

Rather than rehash past campaigns, Beyond Cause Marketing will build on the success of last year’s run by gathering leading cause marketing practitioners from corporations, charities, and agencies together with disruptors and innovators from other disciplines to challenge the commonly held assumptions of cause marketing. This diverse group of leaders will create new frameworks and approaches for how companies, charities, and government can better engage and encourage the public to solve social issues.”

Scott Henderson and his team (Amy Mai Bertelsen  and Brian Reich) led us through one-one-one discussions and collaboration sessions, expanding the horizon. It was a very special morning and

Here are a few tweets from the morning, just to give you a few insights the group gathered:

  • @sloane: People want us to build a bonfire but give us 2 sticks, a match and it’s really cold & wet outside.
  • @sd913: Get out of your comfort zone and try things out!
  • @CaseyB: @stmhoward says we need more cause intelligence – be a listener that distills true meaning.
  • @sd913: Stop measuring: 1. Reach 2. Size 3. Awareness/Impressions
  • @sonarc: data/=insight. more data/=more insight, more likely = confusion. Telling a story based on data? priceless
  • @sd913: Social is about finding expertise rapidly. Bringing teams together. Organizing ppl in a rapid fashion to take action
  • @sattler360: Lots of small actions can add up quickly. Time to change ‘go big or go home’ to ‘go small lots of times?
  • @TeshiShell: We need to start treating social as an ecosystem instead of individual tools, says @calebbarlow of IBM
  • @mktg4good: @brianreich – stop what you’re doing, simplify your purpose into an 8 word sentence, communicate it, see what happens

It’s just the beginning of a journey.

My biggest takeaway is that we just need to get started. Yes, we have major economic problems and I’m big fan of being aware of the macro-economic issues and challenges, building a better world in the spirit of Umair Haque’s The New Capitalist Manifesto: Building a Disruptively Better Business. But we have to make sure to start the work now, in the spirit of Seth Godin’s premise of Linchpin.

Changing the world can be as simple (and brilliant) as finding a new use for a bottle of water.

Low-cost, high-impact, life-changing.

Rock on.