Archives for posts with tag: interactions

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By now, everybody knows that customers to Yahoo!, Facebook, Google, MSN, NY Times, WSJ, etc. are not the visitors. Advertisers are the customers. All these sites make money selling advertising. Over time we learned, placing ads on Facebook is much less effective than placing them on Yahoo!, WSJ or even MySpace.

How come? Wasn’t the narrative that Facebook knows everything about us? That they unlocked the gate to the holy grail of marketing? The frictionless sharing paradigm will lead us to the golden ages of marketing, including fountains of youth and unlimited budgets.

Right?

Right.

Think about what you do all day and what you share on Facebook. (Forget about the few exceptions that share everything.) I bet it’s less than 0.1% for 99% of all Facebook users. I would even bet it’s less than 0.001% for for 98% of all Facebook users. You do thousands of things today and you may share 1-2 posts daily, if you’re a heavy users.

Compare that to major sites. They’ve been around forever. Some, like Yahoo!, Google and MSN, have their own email product. You read news on Yahoo or MSN, never on Facebook. If you want to find a local movie, you visit Bing. If you want to see TV listings, you go to Yahoo! While so many people proclaim Yahoo! is already in the coffin and rotting away, have a look at the rate of interaction on some of their sections. More people search on Yahoo! than on Facebook.

Since Yahoo (and all these other major sites) are connected to massive ad networks and ad exchanges, they track what you like, what you do, where you live and understand more about your real digital life than Facebook could ever imagine. Google didn’t build Maps and Google Documents to help you through your daily life. They build all these tools to understand each user better.

Facebook doesn’t have acces to that information. Yet. That’s why I get these silly ads.

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I don’t care about any of these products. Ever.

This doesn’t mean the future is a black hole for Facebook. The future might be all rainbows.

The present? A different story. When brands tell me they want to increase their Facebook ad spending dramatically in the next 6 months, I wonder if it’s because the bandwagon is coming through their town or because they see real business results. Sure, there are brands that are successful using the Facebook ad project. The majority should be looking for other (“OLD”) targeting tactics to get good results in the short-term.

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Image: Courtesy of farm4.static

Transforming an enterprise into a community is consistent with an increasing amount of dissatisfaction with the dominant concept of what a corporation is and who owns it. Community enterprises are created by common purpose rather than a common place. Nobody owns the community. Communities consider members as citizen and not as human resources. Citizen with varied responsibilities as well as rights.

Transforming an enterprise into a community is imperative to allow the system to focus on interaction of all parts and not on separate actions. A community enterprise allows everyone to participate in making decisions that affect them directly. In addition, control is circular, not linear. We don’t recommend eliminating hierarchies because labor must be coordinated in a complex working environment. But hierarchies don’t equal autocracies.

Community Design

Each manager will have a board, consisting of the manager’s supervisor, his subordinates and pertinent stakeholders. Most managers will be part of three levels of boards, interacting with five levels of management. This amount of interactions and access significantly reduces internally generated problems.

The boards are tasked to plan, police themselves, coordinate and integrate with other boards, improve quality of work life and overall performance and, last but not least, approve the board chair.

Boards meet at least once a month. The difference to normal meetings, that often accomplish nothing, is that managers don’t consider them as work interruptions. Instead, board meetings help managers to manage interactions with all stakeholders and facilitate their work. Boards don’t operate under the tyranny of majority, their goal is to operate by consensus. If consensus can’t be achieved, board members are tasked to work under the premise of consensus through experimentation. However, board members have to consent on the success metrics of the test and  a follow-up plan.

The agenda can be set by any member of the board. In the early stages of the enterprise transformation, a facilitator might be used to help the board with the first baby steps. This should be supported with an initial introduction to group processes.

Each board acts independently, can implement any decision if it doesn’t affect any other or the organization as a whole. Managers should ask their boards for advice on decisions they have to make but the responsibility for the decisions is solely with the managers, not the boards.

Empowering all stakeholders compered to empowering a few managers will improve the performance of the enterprise dramatically.

Let’s discuss this further in Part 9.

Previous installations can be found here: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6 and Part 7.